What is Tax Loss Harvesting in India? – Take benefit from loss-making shares

What is Tax Loss Harvesting in India for stocks and mutual funds | Tax Loss Harvesting rules | example of What is Tax Loss Harvesting in India

This post was most recently updated on December 24th, 2022

Tax loss harvesting in stocks and mutual funds is a strategy that involves selling stocks or mutual funds that have experienced a loss in value, in order to offset capital gains and potentially reduce tax liability. It can be a useful tool for investors who have realized gains in other parts of their portfolio and are looking for ways to manage their overall tax bill.

Tax Loss Harvesting
Tax Loss Harvesting

What is Tax loss harvesting and its meaning?

Here’s how tax loss harvesting works:

  1. Identify securities that have experienced a loss: Look for securities that you own that have decreased in value since you purchased them. These may be stocks, exchange-traded funds (ETFs), mutual funds, or other types of securities.
  2. Sell the securities: In order to harvest the loss, you’ll need to sell the securities that have decreased in value. You can sell them through your brokerage account or through a financial advisor.
  3. Use the loss to offset gains: Once you’ve sold the securities, you can use the loss to offset capital gains that you’ve realized in other parts of your portfolio. For example, if you have Rs 1 Laksh in capital gains and Rs 1 Lakh in capital losses, you can offset the gains with the losses, effectively canceling out the tax liability on those gains.

Consider reading – Income tax exemptions and deductions for salaried employees

Tax loss harvesting example in India

Tax loss harvesting has to be done in the same financial year. To be specific, if you are selling stocks in stocks or mutual funds to realize long-term capital loss then you must offset the long-term capital gains of the same financial year.

Here is an example of tax loss harvesting in India:

Assume that an investor has the following capital gains and losses in the current tax year:

  • INR 500,000 in short-term capital gains
  • INR 500,000 in long-term capital gains
  • INR 500,000 in short-term capital losses
  • INR 400,000 in long-term capital losses

The investor can use the capital losses to offset the capital gains as follows:

  • The short-term capital losses can be used to offset the short-term capital gains, resulting in a net short-term gain of INR 0 (INR 500,000 in gains minus INR 500,000 in losses).
  • The long-term capital losses can be used to offset the long-term capital gains, resulting in a net long-term gain of INR 100,000 (INR 500,000 in gains minus INR 400,000 in losses).

The investor will be required to pay taxes on the net short-term gain(which is INR 0) and the net long-term gain at the applicable tax rates. (Since long-term capital gain upto INR 100,000 in a year is tax-free – you do not have to pay any long-term capital gain taxes)

The key thing to note here is Tax loss harvesting only works for long-term capital gains. i.e. you can not offset short-term capital gains with your long-term capital loss or vice versa.

Consider reading: How much tax you need to pay on the sale of shares and mutual funds

Tax loss harvesting Calculator

You can use the Tax loss harvesting calculator to understand how much capital gains tax you need to pay when you sell your stocks and mutual funds. Here is a Tax loss harvesting Calculator for India:

Tax loss harvesting – Capital gain Rules in India

In India, tax loss harvesting is governed by the Income Tax Act of 1961 and the rules and regulations set forth by the Indian Income Tax Department. Here are some key rules to be aware of when it comes to tax loss harvesting in India:

  1. Capital gains must be reported: If you sell securities that have experienced a capital gain, you must report the gain on your tax return and pay taxes on the gain. Similarly, if you sell securities that have experienced a capital loss, you can use the loss to offset capital gains and potentially reduce your tax liability.
  2. Losses can be carried over to future tax years: If you have capital losses that you are unable to offset in the current tax year, you can carry the losses over to future tax years. For example, if you have INR 100,000 in capital gains and INR 150,000 in capital losses in the current tax year, you can offset INR 100,000 of the losses and carry over the remaining INR 50,000 to future tax years.
  3. Short-term and long-term capital gains are taxed differently: In India, short-term capital gains (gains on securities held for less than one year) are taxed at the investor’s marginal tax rate, while long-term capital gains (gains on securities held for more than one year) are taxed at a lower rate of 10% (without indexation) or 20% (with indexation).
  4. Losses on securities held for less than three years are short-term losses: If you sell securities that you have held for less than three years and realize a capital loss, the loss will be classified as a short-term loss. Short-term losses can be used to offset short-term gains or long-term gains.
  5. Losses on securities held for more than three years are long-term losses: If you sell securities that you have held for more than three years and realize a capital loss, the loss will be classified as a long-term loss. Long-term losses can be used to offset long-term gains or short-term gains.

Benefits of Tax Loss Harvesting in India

In India, tax loss harvesting can be a useful tool for reducing tax liability, particularly for investors who have experienced significant capital gains from the sale of securities. Some of the specific benefits of tax loss harvesting in India include:

  1. Reducing tax liability: By offsetting capital gains with capital losses, tax loss harvesting can help reduce the overall tax liability for an individual or business.
  2. Flexibility: Tax loss harvesting can be applied to a variety of different investments, including stocks, mutual funds, and other securities. This allows investors to tailor their tax loss harvesting strategy to their specific investment portfolio.
  3. Timing: Tax loss harvesting can be done at any point during the year, allowing investors to take advantage of market fluctuations and adjust their strategy accordingly.
  4. Simplicity: Tax loss harvesting can be a relatively straightforward process, especially with the help of a financial advisor or tax professional.

Key things to keep in mind before doing Tax Harvesting in India

There are several key things to keep in mind before implementing a tax harvesting strategy in India:

  1. Understand the rules and restrictions: It is important to understand the rules and restrictions that apply to tax harvesting in India, including the wash sale rules mentioned above. Violating these rules can result in the loss of the tax benefits associated with tax harvesting.
  2. Plan ahead: Tax harvesting should be carefully planned and executed in order to maximize the benefits. This may involve monitoring the performance of securities in your investment portfolio and identifying opportunities to sell securities that have experienced a loss.
  3. Consider the long-term: While tax loss harvesting can be a useful tool for reducing tax liability, it is important to consider the long-term potential of the securities being sold. It may not be advisable to sell securities that have long-term potential for appreciation simply for the purpose of tax loss harvesting.
  4. Seek professional advice: Tax harvesting can be a complex process, and it is recommended to seek the advice of a financial advisor or tax professional before implementing this strategy. They can help you understand the rules and restrictions that apply and develop a tax loss harvesting plan that is tailored to your specific situation.
  5. Keep good records: It is important to keep good records of any securities sold for a loss for tax loss harvesting purposes. This will help you track your capital losses and ensure that you are able to take advantage of the tax benefits associated with tax loss harvesting.

FAQs on Tax loss harvesting

  1. Is tax loss harvesting allowed in India?

    Yes, tax loss harvesting is allowed in India. Investors can sell securities that have experienced a loss in order to offset capital gains and potentially reduce tax liability.

  2. How do I calculate my capital gains or losses in India?

    To calculate your capital gains or losses in India, you need to determine the difference between the purchase price and the sale price of a security. If the sale price is higher than the purchase price, you have a capital gain. If the sale price is lower than the purchase price, you have a capital loss.

  3. Can I use tax loss harvesting to offset all of my capital gains in India?

    Yes, you can use tax loss harvesting to offset all of your capital gains in India, as long as you have enough capital losses to offset the gains. For example, if you have INR 100,000 in capital gains and INR 100,000 in capital losses, you can offset the entire INR 100,000 in gains with the losses.

  4. Is there a limit to the amount of capital losses I can offset with tax loss harvesting in India?

    There is no limit to the amount of capital losses you can offset with tax loss harvesting in India. You can use all of your capital losses to offset your capital gains, and any remaining losses can be carried over to future tax years.

  5. Is there a time limit for implementing tax loss harvesting strategies in India?

    The tax loss harvesting window in India is generally open from the beginning of the financial year until the end of the tax year. This means that you can sell securities that have experienced a loss and use the loss to offset gains in other parts of your portfolio anytime between April 1 and March 31 (assuming you are on a financial tax year).

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